Sex texting in sha

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Richard C. Perverse Romanticism: Aesthetics and Sexuality in Britain, Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, Romantic-era medical professionals found increasing resonance in the concept of function, but they were also faced with its inverse epistemological category: functionlessness. In light of changing understandings of the sexed body, the Romantics emphasized the perverse--and especially perverse sexuality--in order to question normative cultural structures, including gender hierarchy and heteronormativity.

Gray on Sha, 'Perverse Romanticism: Aesthetics and Sexuality in Britain, 1750-1832'

The Masculine Cross and Ancient Sex Worship: Rocco, Sha: michellelobrien.com: Books

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required. To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number. The book contains much which is covered in the other entries in this literature. The author places an inordinate amount of significance on anything that is vaguely phallic looking or resembles a vagina. This includes pawn shop signage, tortoise heads, arched doors, lozange-shaped design elements, and so on.

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Habermas argues that in the eighteenth century, private vices were translated into public virtues; from the intimate spaces of the conjugal family came the public virtues of companionate love, voluntary association, and self-cultivation; from private commerce came acquisitiveness, competition, and rational calculation. This essay uses Habermas to reexamine Foucaultian histories of sexuality, arguing that the enormous medical literature on pleasure--luxury, sexual pleasure, masturbation, nerves--polices this transition from private vice to public virtue, but in sometimes surprising ways. The key was to explain why certain pleasurable experiences acquisitiveness for its own sake and sexual intimacy outside the normative middle-class family were not legitimately or even empirically pleasurable, despite potential somatic evidence to the contrary. It is my contention that this shift from vice into virtue was far from smooth—and that the enormous medical literature on pleasure—luxury, sexual pleasure, masturbation, nerves—should be seen as policing this transition. Insofar as the eighteenth century understood virtue and vice in simple terms of empirical bodily experiences of pleasure and pain—pleasure was associated with virtue, vice with pain—the key was to explain why certain pleasurable experiences acquisitiveness for its own sake and sexual intimacy outside the normative middle-class family were not legitimately or even empirically pleasurable, despite potential somatic evidence to the contrary.
The jacket copy for this book tells us that it "considers how science shaped notions of sexuality, reproduction, and gender in the Romantic period. Yet Sha's book does not quite fit comfortably with the two main strands of this growing body of criticism. It certainly doesn't fit with the ecologically centered Green Romanticism represented by critics such as Jonathan Bate, James McKusick, Onno Oerlemans, Ashton Nichols, and Timothy Morton though there are affinities with Morton in Sha's desire to build opaquely complex theoretical edifices.